Tag Archives: Facebook

GUEST BLOGGER: Miss Pale Pink Coat Has the Skinny on New Facebook Vanity URLs

Facebook

After long last, Facebook is finally making vanity URLs available to individual users (corporate users have had this option for awhile).  Starting at 12:01 am on June 13th you can log onto this page
www.facebook.com/username/and register your vanity URL.  If you have a
very common name – i.e. Brian Smith – I suggest you stay up until Midnight
and register it quickly. Common names will be the first to disappear.  Now
instead of our URL being a series of numbers, you’ll be able to apply your
name.  Changes will make sharing your Facebook account much easier! 

Think of how great it’ll be to just have facebook.com/briansmith on a business card or within your email signature.

Here are few tips for picking the right user name:

1. Try to stick with the same user name across all platforms.  For
example, you can find me on Twitter, LinkedIn, Google Profiles,Skype and
Flickrwith the username “lmdupont”.  I’ve picked this rather than just
“lisaann” because many people spell that wrong.  To keep it simple I use
“lmdupont” whenever possible.
2. Keep to your personal name – don’t be tempted to tie your name with
your company name. A great example of why this doesn’t always work is
Dell.  Many Dell employees use “DellRICHARD” or something similar.  Well,
what happens if you leave Dell? Your entire social media identity is tied
to Dell.  Personal brand first, then business.
3. Make sure your vanity URL choice is easy to spell.
4. Try to stay away from a vanity URL choice that is too long – i.e.
facebook.com/lisaannfromredondobeach – that’s just too much!
5. Don’t be too cutesy. It may look cute today, but is it going to look
cute in 5-10 years when you’re facebook.com/hotbabymomma? Uh, no.

Other tips:
1.Update your email signature with your new Facebook address ASAP.
2. Have your Facebook address added to your business cards.
3. Update your Facebook address on your LinkedIn page if you have it
linked there.
4. Send out a tweet on Twitter with your new Facebook info.

GUEST BLOGGER: Miss Pale Pink Coat Pretties Up Job Seekers’ Google Profiles

Your Google ranking is more important than ever. Also important, whether you’re a job seeker or small business owner, is being able to be found.

Google profile is a simple way to set up camp within Google searches so people can find you or your business.  They can then contact you from right within your Google profile with the “Send a Message” function.

A Google profile is simply how you present yourself on Google to the world. Your profile will come up anytime someone Googles your name so it’s a great way to make a first impression – because you control the content.

It allows you to control how you appear on Google and tell others a bit more about who you are. You can include, for example, links to your blog, online photos and other profiles such as Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and more.  You don’t even have to include your direct contact information if you don’t want that made public – just verify your email address and they’ll add a “Send a Message” function to your page.

We’ll use my Google page as a sample:

http://www.google.com/profiles/lisaanndupont

 1 image, name, headline, location

2 ability to email

3 links

4 bio

profile

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Click <a href=”https://www.google.com/accounts/ServiceLogin?service=profiles&continue=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com%2Fprofiles%2Fme%2Feditprofile%3Fedit%3Dh&skipvpage=false&ltmpl=me#about”>here</a> to start your Google profile today.

 Job Seeker Tips:

  • Use the same headline here that you use on LinkedIn.
  • Obvious but we have to say it: link to your LinkedIn profile
  • Post your resume
  • Cut & paste some of your LinkedIn recommendations and use them on your Google profile page
  • Make your contact information clear and easy to find
  • Don’t link to your personal Flickr account if there are overly personal photos there – i.e. drinking, partying or anything of the sort [and why do you have those photos ANYWHERE Google can find them?! Remove them NOW!]
  • Put your Google profile URL on your resume, Web site and LinkedIn page

Have a Google profile already? Leave your URL in the comment below; we’d love to see how everyone is customizing their pages!

Don’t Give a Damn ‘Bout Your [Online] Reputation? Your Next Employer Sure Does

It’s not just teen girls texting or emailing pictures of their boobs to the high school football stud. Grownups – yes, that means you – have just as much to worry about when it comes to their online activity. In fact, your next job could be at risk! In a recent e-newsletter from Pink Magazine, executive recruiting experts ExecuNet reported that 77 percent of employers do searches on job candidates; 35 percent of those have axed prospects based on what they find.

Online reputation management has become big business. And for good reason. Even I put my radar up: New Year’s Eve landed right after my last day at the old job, and we had a nice, little house party at a girlfriend’s house. Just 10-15 friends, gourmet party food, wine, a good iMix, etc. Well, I was – as my dad would say – “overserved”. Three days later, the hostess posts pics to her Facebook page, and there I am getting jiggy with it with my black sequin tank top and jeans covered in Chardonnay. I’m sweaty and obviously drunk. I freaked out and had her not only untag the pic but also remove it. I was in prime job hunting mode and couldn’t risk that beaut going anywhere – no matter if she kindly had her pictures set for only friends to view or not.

And don’t think you’re immune from that 10-year old photo of you doing a keg stand. People are posting old sorority/fraternity party pics in droves. I’m just waiting for a “good” one to surface…

Educate yourself fast. Please don’t allow yourself to unknowingly look like an ass online. Below are three links for more information:

  • David Ramel discusses online reputation management and the job search in May’s Computerworld
  • Duct Tape Marketing has listed 34 great online reputation management tools
  • Purewire Trust is a free online site where you can verify your reputation information as well as info on those with whom you interact online

Have you had any reasons to be worried? Spill it. I told you mine, didn’t I?

Guest Blogger, Miss Pale Pink Coat: Networking…It’s Not About You

networkingMore terrific job hunting advice from Miss Pale Pink Coat of Pale Pink Coat PR. This is critical information to have as you network. The gist: stop thinking it’s all about you. It’s all about what you can do for someone else.

 

Networking has become the backbone to job searching these days.  You’re going to networking events and using social media but nothing is happening.  Are you networking correctly?

 

Let’s talk about your “I just attended a networking event” strategy. You’ve had a cocktail, meet a lot of people and collected a stack of business cards. Now what? Do not, under any circumstances, go home and email everyone your resume.  I’M BEGGING YOU. Being an effective networker isn’t about you, it’s about the relationship you are building. Show your value and they will come, trust me.

 

This is my day-after-networking-event-strategy:

 

1.Organize all the business cards I’ve collected and enter them into my online database/address book.

2.Do a quick search to see if they are on Twitter and follow them if they are.

3.Email a note referencing the networking event and *something specific* we talked about.  If a meeting or lunch was suggested during the introduction, I make a move to set that up.

4.Offer a link to an article related to something we spoke about and/or that might be of interest to them [this is the beginning of showing value to them].

5.Send an email to the organizer of the event and ask if he/she needs help organizing their next event, ask if they ever use speakers, etc. Make yourself a *resource for the organizer*.

6.Any new contacts that answer my day-after email within 24 hours, I’ll jump onto LinkedIn and ask them to connect.

 

 Ten day strategy:

 

Hopefully within ten days, I’ve scheduled a few lunch or meetings with these new connections.  If it’s a lunch, I approach it somewhat casually and only discuss business once they do.  When I’m job searching, I do not bring up my background until asked.  If they already know you’re looking for a job, they will ask.  I know it’s frustrating when job searching that things don’t happen more quickly but you must be patient.  During lunch, I’ll talk about things going on in our industry [in my case social media and the music industry] and more often or not these discussions will lead to another common connection.  TIP: Do not name drop someone you do not actually know and/or someone who would not give you a glowing reference. Chances are the person you’re meeting with will call them and ask about you.  Be authentic and put your best foot forward – yourself.

 

Within ten days, I may reach out to the networking organizer again and say, simply, “Is there anything I can do to help you?”. You’d be surprised how much this question can disarm people.  “Is there anything I can do to help you?” is the backbone of effective networking.  Don’t ask that question unless you mean it and are willing to follow through.

 

If any of my emails from the day-after batch have gone unanswered, I may try to figure out if I can connect that person within anyone else – again, adding value – by sharing my network with them [without them asking].

Example – I meet a busy PR person and send a follow up email but they don’t reply.  Ten days out, I get an email from a friend who happens to be a stylist. Great. Let’s hook them up. Quick email to PR lady and cc Stylist saying “PR lady, It was great to meet you last week at the Unnamed Networking Event.  I’d like to introduce you to Stylist.  Stylist is a former colleague of mine and her work is incredible! She’s worked with Star, Star, Star.  You two should definitely connect.  Best Regards, Lisaann”.  That’s it. I’ve offered PR lady some value and hopefully made a great introduction for my friend, Stylist.

 

That was great networking because it had nothing to do with me.  PR lady sees that I don’t expect anything from her on a personal level but sees that I can add value to her network [and business].  People tend to shut down, in a networking sense, when they just think you WANT something from them.

 

Try this approach.  You’ll be surprised how many genuine connections you get this way.  I wouldn’t be surprised if PR lady calls me two months later and says “Hey, sorry I’ve been out of touch, we need to have lunch to discuss A Really Big Project.”  Thing is, we were never really IN TOUCH because old me would have thought she blew me off.  New me understands that this is true networking and results don’t happen overnight.  And right here I’d jump back to #6 from the list and see if she’s on LinkedIn and offer to connect.

 

Show your value and the will come, trust me.

 

Give Miss Pale Pink Coat a shout!

www.palepinkcoat.com

e: hello@palepinkcoat.com

 

 

Get Thee a UPiC: A Salute to My Unemployed Partner-in-Crime

I’ve only mentioned my UPiC once on the blog, but I have to give her a proper shout-out. Don’t know if I would have survived the last two months of joblessness without her.

Some days, we’re the only people each of us sees. We drink cheap red wine and Coors Light at home together while watching “The Office” reruns on TBS, we take lunch breaks to the cheap Mexican joint when we have a little extra cash and we brainstorm all sorts of  ridiculous ideas for earning money. We keep tabs on each other throughout the day via email and cell in order to squash any insecure or nervy feelings you get from having no job and no money.

All this may sound a little needy, but it’s needy in the best possible way. You’d be shocked how much you need to vent when you’re out of work.

If you don’t have a UPiC, I suggest you find one. Now. Go on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn; attend a MeetUp group for job seekers, randomly poll people at Starbucks, whatever. I met a couple of fellow unemployed girls for coffee on Wednesday morning, and it was so therapeutic. Whaddya know? I’m not crazy after all!

Thanks, UPiC. You’re the best!