Tag Archives: LinkedIn

GUEST BLOGGER: Ken Herron Shows and Tells – Create an Online Portfolio to Help You Get Your Next Job

You have a resume.  Your competitor has a resume.  So how can you show your unique background, skills and experience to maximize your online presence and shorten your job search?   Create an online portfolio.  Beef up your existing LinkedIn profile, and create additional online resumes with VisualCV (I practice what I preach, see: http://visualcv.com/kenherron).  You can only have one profile on LinkedIn, but you can have multiple VisualCVs.  

 Here are five things you should include in your online portfolio to stand out in front of recruiters, HR professionals and hiring managers.    

#1 Your Book on Amazon  For those of us who have not (yet!) written our first book, we have likely written an article, demonstrating both our expertise and our writing skills.  If not, and if you do not yet have your own Web site or blog, self-publish your document on Slideshare.  

#2 Your Recommendations  Third parties can always tout our talents more aggressively, and more credibly, than we can ourselves.  LinkedIn has an excellent recommendation tool, and you should pursue specific recommendations from recent executives, supervisors, peers, subordinates, customers and industry leaders. You can also cite relevant recommendations in your thank you notes to interviewers to reinforce why you are the best candidate for a position.  

#3 Your Work Samples  Show off the best public domain (i.e., non-proprietary) samples of your work. For team-based work, be sure to articulate your specific contributions.  This isn’t just for marketing folks who have produced sales collateral.  Top technical executive recruiter Marsh Sutherland says software engineers should showcase samples of their best coding for download and review.  Don’t forget to include any work which has won awards!  

#4 Your Press Clippings  If you have been interviewed by, or quoted in the media as an expert in your field, be sure to include it.  If not, sign up today on Help a Reporter Out to identify opportunities to share your knowledge with a reporter on deadline who is seeking someone with your exact expertise.  

#5 You, Speaking Publicly  The golden ticket is an online video of you presenting to a roaring crowd (regardless of size).  If you do not already have this, present yourself as a confident, competent public speaker in your field by seeking out an appropriate local organization, and ask to speak at one of their upcoming meetings.  Have a friend video you – be sure to practice first, you don’t want an unexpected technical glitch to keep your brilliance from the world!  If you don’t yet have the skills to effectively speak in front of a live audience, sign up today for your local Toastmasters. Finally, if just the thought of public speaking terrifies you, upload a PowerPoint presentation to Slideshare to show your ability to clearly communicate your ideas. Use the audio feature to add your own voice to your presentation.  

Be remarkable.  Be different.  And think outside your resume!    

An award-winning global marketer, Ken Herron lives in Boston as he networks, online and offline, to find his next job.

GUEST BLOGGER: Ken Herron Shares 5 Things You Should Be Doing Online to Find Your Next Job

I am a marketing geek, who, like many of you, is “actively seeking” my next job.  Job hunt experts consistently tell us the best way to find our next job is in-person networking.  What they don’t always mention, however, is that maximizing our online presence will also help us to find our next job faster.

Here are five things you should be doing to increase the likelihood of being “found” online by recruiters, HR professionals and hiring managers.  When you submit for jobs online, they also give people helpful information supporting your submission.

#1  Use the same version of your name — everywhere
You don’t need to understand the latest SEO (Search Engine Optimization) techniques to know that using multiple versions of your name in your resumes, online profiles and in real life makes you harder to find online. 

#2  Google, Yahoo!, and Bing yourself — weekly
Are you on the first page of search results?  Are you nowhere to be found?  Do photos and/or videos pop up showing you wearing nothing but a hat comprised of several different kinds of tropical fruit?  You should know exactly what comes up when your name is entered into the most popular search engines.

#3  Create a Google profile
I know of no other guaranteed, real-time way to get exactly the information you want about yourself — including text, photos, and links — on the bottom of the first page of Google search results for your name.  Didn’t even know Google had profiles?  Learn more at: http://www.slideshare.net/KenHerron/how-to-leverage-your-google-profile (full disclosure: this is a presentation I gave recently at a conference on the topic). 

#4  Really use your LinkedIn profile
Having a complete, up-to-date LinkedIn profile is not enough.  Actively use LinkedIn on a daily basis for online networking.  To start, update your status to network with your connections, join groups to make new connections, answer questions to demonstrate your expertise and review LinkedIn’s job postings.

#5  Cross link
Include the web links to your relevant online profiles, recommendations, portfolios, papers, presentations and videos on both your paper and online resumes.  Always include the links to the most relevant profiles (e.g., Google, LinkedIn, VisualCV, etc.) in your e-mail signature lines and cover letters.

The Internet has exploded our job search tools from a kid-size box of crayons to a warehouse club-size tub.  Take full advantage of all the different web “crayons” available, and you will dramatically shorten your job search!

An award-winning global marketer, Ken Herron (http://www.google.com/profiles/kenherron) lives in Boston as he networks, online and offline, to find his next job.

Thanks, Ken! Keep us posted on your progress!

GUEST BLOGGER: Miss Pale Pink Coat Has the Skinny on New Facebook Vanity URLs

Facebook

After long last, Facebook is finally making vanity URLs available to individual users (corporate users have had this option for awhile).  Starting at 12:01 am on June 13th you can log onto this page
www.facebook.com/username/and register your vanity URL.  If you have a
very common name – i.e. Brian Smith – I suggest you stay up until Midnight
and register it quickly. Common names will be the first to disappear.  Now
instead of our URL being a series of numbers, you’ll be able to apply your
name.  Changes will make sharing your Facebook account much easier! 

Think of how great it’ll be to just have facebook.com/briansmith on a business card or within your email signature.

Here are few tips for picking the right user name:

1. Try to stick with the same user name across all platforms.  For
example, you can find me on Twitter, LinkedIn, Google Profiles,Skype and
Flickrwith the username “lmdupont”.  I’ve picked this rather than just
“lisaann” because many people spell that wrong.  To keep it simple I use
“lmdupont” whenever possible.
2. Keep to your personal name – don’t be tempted to tie your name with
your company name. A great example of why this doesn’t always work is
Dell.  Many Dell employees use “DellRICHARD” or something similar.  Well,
what happens if you leave Dell? Your entire social media identity is tied
to Dell.  Personal brand first, then business.
3. Make sure your vanity URL choice is easy to spell.
4. Try to stay away from a vanity URL choice that is too long – i.e.
facebook.com/lisaannfromredondobeach – that’s just too much!
5. Don’t be too cutesy. It may look cute today, but is it going to look
cute in 5-10 years when you’re facebook.com/hotbabymomma? Uh, no.

Other tips:
1.Update your email signature with your new Facebook address ASAP.
2. Have your Facebook address added to your business cards.
3. Update your Facebook address on your LinkedIn page if you have it
linked there.
4. Send out a tweet on Twitter with your new Facebook info.

GUEST BLOGGER: Miss Pale Pink Coat Pretties Up Job Seekers’ Google Profiles

Your Google ranking is more important than ever. Also important, whether you’re a job seeker or small business owner, is being able to be found.

Google profile is a simple way to set up camp within Google searches so people can find you or your business.  They can then contact you from right within your Google profile with the “Send a Message” function.

A Google profile is simply how you present yourself on Google to the world. Your profile will come up anytime someone Googles your name so it’s a great way to make a first impression – because you control the content.

It allows you to control how you appear on Google and tell others a bit more about who you are. You can include, for example, links to your blog, online photos and other profiles such as Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and more.  You don’t even have to include your direct contact information if you don’t want that made public – just verify your email address and they’ll add a “Send a Message” function to your page.

We’ll use my Google page as a sample:

http://www.google.com/profiles/lisaanndupont

 1 image, name, headline, location

2 ability to email

3 links

4 bio

profile

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Click <a href=”https://www.google.com/accounts/ServiceLogin?service=profiles&continue=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com%2Fprofiles%2Fme%2Feditprofile%3Fedit%3Dh&skipvpage=false&ltmpl=me#about”>here</a> to start your Google profile today.

 Job Seeker Tips:

  • Use the same headline here that you use on LinkedIn.
  • Obvious but we have to say it: link to your LinkedIn profile
  • Post your resume
  • Cut & paste some of your LinkedIn recommendations and use them on your Google profile page
  • Make your contact information clear and easy to find
  • Don’t link to your personal Flickr account if there are overly personal photos there – i.e. drinking, partying or anything of the sort [and why do you have those photos ANYWHERE Google can find them?! Remove them NOW!]
  • Put your Google profile URL on your resume, Web site and LinkedIn page

Have a Google profile already? Leave your URL in the comment below; we’d love to see how everyone is customizing their pages!

Get Personal: Behind That LinkedIn Profile Is a Human Being, You Know

linkedin4http://blog.linkedin.com/2009/04/29/susan-bernstein-stop-looking-for-a-job-start-looking-to-meet-people/

Love Susan Bernstein’s post (click link above) based on the best career advice she ever got: “Stop looking for a job. Start looking to meet people.”

Sometimes when we’re networking, we tend to forget that these “contacts” we’re pursuing are real people with real interests, real backgrounds, real challenges and real lives. They’re not just names and email addresses in an Outlook file waiting to receive a boring form letter from you addressing your job search and the desire for them to review your resume and “feel free to contact [me] with any questions.” 

STOP RIGHT THERE!

Meet these folks face-to-face, talk to them on the phone, show them your personality and demonstrate your talents. See what YOU can do for THEM instead of what they can do for you. Dazzle ’em. You can refrain from the jazz hands, but they will never know how incredible you are until you build actual relationships with them.

I met so many new people during my job search, and I’m keeping in touch with almost all of them. Throughout conversations, coffees, lunches, etc., we’ve developed symbiotic friendships, and now, they know I place more value on them as people than as business cards. It’s time to get personal: You never know where these relationships will lead.

Guest Blogger: Miss Pale Pink Coat’s Top 7 Tips for Twitter Job Search Success

Use your Twitter account to find a job! A few simple tips will take you a long way …

1. Did you know you can customize your Twitter background? YES! It’s like free advertising – use that space. Invest in a custom twitter background and highlight your career successes – think of it as a mini resume.
2. Use a professional looking photo as your user image. No cheeky self portraits here please [save that for MySpace]. Post a clear crisp head shot.
3. Use the Twitter bio space for your job pitch. Think in keywords because searches are used for the bio space. Make sure a recruiter can find you.
4. Link to your LinkedIn profile or online resume
5. Tweet about your job search in an upbeat way. Debbie Downer doesn’t get the job, she’s too annoying.
6. Post links that fellow job seekers may find useful. Goodwill goes a long way.
7. Follow @MsPinkSlip_Blog

Miss Pale Pink Coat Wants to Makeover YOUR LinkedIn Profile

Click on the below link for more details!

glob_logo

 

http://www.palepinkcoat.com/blog/2009/04/linkedin-makeover-spring-special-get.html