Tag Archives: networking

Atlanta Networking Happy Hour Feb. 17 at Tavern 99

From Jenny Jeansonne:
 
“As many of you know I try to help the unemployed of Atlanta as much as I can.
I host free networking happy hours once a month and post job leads.
 
My next happy hour is Wed Feb 17th at Tavern 99.
Please RSVP via the Evite: http://tiny.cc/ATLjobs
 
People can find Atlanta Job Leads at http://atlantajobleads.wordpress.com
 
If you are hiring or know anyone that is looking for qualified individuals – please have them email me the job description and how to apply.  I will post it (for free on my blog)
 
My blog and networking group began in MARCH 2009 and my blog has received over 40K visits and my networking has helped over 1000 people in the Atlanta area. And none of this would be successful without your help!
 
Thank you so much!”
Jenny Jeansonne

Attn. Atlanta Unemployed: Networking Happy Hour This Thursday

Super-networker Jenny Jeansonne is hosting a Networking Happy Hour this Thursday, October 22 at Lenox Square Grill (was The Clubhouse).

She’s already invited over 100 recruiters. It’s Free Parking. Free to Attend. Free Appetizers too!
 
 
Atlanta still has one of the highest unemployment rates in the country. Jenny is trying to help as many unemployed people as possible so they may have jobs by the holidays and really have something to celebrate.
 
Jenny posts jobs daily at http://atlantajobleads.wordpress.com – all industries, all careers levels.
 
If your company is hiring (or if you know of a company hiring),  please let her know and she’ll post it for free.
 

GUEST BLOGGER: Ken Herron Shares 5 Things You Should Be Doing Online to Find Your Next Job

I am a marketing geek, who, like many of you, is “actively seeking” my next job.  Job hunt experts consistently tell us the best way to find our next job is in-person networking.  What they don’t always mention, however, is that maximizing our online presence will also help us to find our next job faster.

Here are five things you should be doing to increase the likelihood of being “found” online by recruiters, HR professionals and hiring managers.  When you submit for jobs online, they also give people helpful information supporting your submission.

#1  Use the same version of your name — everywhere
You don’t need to understand the latest SEO (Search Engine Optimization) techniques to know that using multiple versions of your name in your resumes, online profiles and in real life makes you harder to find online. 

#2  Google, Yahoo!, and Bing yourself — weekly
Are you on the first page of search results?  Are you nowhere to be found?  Do photos and/or videos pop up showing you wearing nothing but a hat comprised of several different kinds of tropical fruit?  You should know exactly what comes up when your name is entered into the most popular search engines.

#3  Create a Google profile
I know of no other guaranteed, real-time way to get exactly the information you want about yourself — including text, photos, and links — on the bottom of the first page of Google search results for your name.  Didn’t even know Google had profiles?  Learn more at: http://www.slideshare.net/KenHerron/how-to-leverage-your-google-profile (full disclosure: this is a presentation I gave recently at a conference on the topic). 

#4  Really use your LinkedIn profile
Having a complete, up-to-date LinkedIn profile is not enough.  Actively use LinkedIn on a daily basis for online networking.  To start, update your status to network with your connections, join groups to make new connections, answer questions to demonstrate your expertise and review LinkedIn’s job postings.

#5  Cross link
Include the web links to your relevant online profiles, recommendations, portfolios, papers, presentations and videos on both your paper and online resumes.  Always include the links to the most relevant profiles (e.g., Google, LinkedIn, VisualCV, etc.) in your e-mail signature lines and cover letters.

The Internet has exploded our job search tools from a kid-size box of crayons to a warehouse club-size tub.  Take full advantage of all the different web “crayons” available, and you will dramatically shorten your job search!

An award-winning global marketer, Ken Herron (http://www.google.com/profiles/kenherron) lives in Boston as he networks, online and offline, to find his next job.

Thanks, Ken! Keep us posted on your progress!

Think You’ve Exhausted Your Job Search? Get a New Perspective

My UPiC (Unemployed Partner-in-Crime) Shelley continues her search for work with her head held high and her goals in check. But after feeling like she’s exhausted every contact, every lead, every meet up and every friend- of-a-friend, she is working to freshen her job hunt with new strategies.

What’s her secret?

Get a new perspective!

Although a meeting planner by trade, Shelley met last night with a PR professional – someone completely outside her field – who was able to read her resume with a fresh eye, provide some new contacts and look into industries she may never have considered. She emerged feeling rejuvenated and is now ready to start today on a new path.

Fresh perspectives are critical. I have an old boss who insisted on interviewing people outside our industry because of their different experiences, likes and dislikes, hobbies, etc. So don’t just limit your contacts to people in your field. Seek people outside your job parameters who have different backgrounds and outlooks. 

For example, don’t turn down a meeting with someone in engineering if you’re in accounting. You never know what might transpire: There may be an opening in the accounting department in their firm, they may know someone in your field from their church, a client may have a position available, his dad could be hiring, you never know.

A different, fresh perspective can be your key to success.

Let me know if this works for you!

Dear MPS: Should I Bite The Hand That Fed Me a Pink Slip?

A reader needs YOUR help! Please weigh in on her dilemma.

Dear Miss Pink Slip,

Now they want me back???

It’s been about three months since I was laid off. From hearing the words “we’re cutting back, and we won’t be able to afford your salary” to the roller coaster of emotions that followed, it’s been one of the most difficult experiences of my life. First, I wondered, “why me? Do they value me less than my colleagues?” Then, I began scanning the job sites religiously, looking for something…anything was better than scrapping by on a measly unemployment check that doesn’t even cover the mortgage. After three months of relentless job searching and networking, I’ve scored a couple interviews, but still no full-time gig. I’ve felt sad, depressed, anxious, nervous, helpless and finally, after a few months of going through all the emotions, I’ve come to a place where I’m actually…should I really say it…happy!

I’ve learned to enjoy the small things again, like cooking, organizing my closet, watching “Oprah”, working out, spending time with my family, actually getting a good night sleep — all the things I was constantly trying to fit into my schedule to no avail when I had a full-time job. I’ve also had time to do some soul searching and realized I was really unhappy. My former boss was, well…in three words, “Devil Wears Prada”. I worked crazy hours and I felt unappreciated. I was burned out, to say the least.

I’ve finally come to a place where I’m thankful I was laid off. I’ve been doing freelance work and even considering starting my own business. Then, today, I get a phone call from my former boss: 

“How are you? We miss you around here! It’s not the same without you.” Blah, blah, blah. This is what your previous employer is supposed to say, right? And of course it feels good to be missed since you wonder if they even thought twice about laying you off. Then she dropped the bomb: “We’d love for you to come back and help us. Can you work on a part-time basis?”

Now I’m stuck between continuing to collect my unemployment check while searching for a job I actually like, doing some freelance work and seeing if I can develop that into a business, or returning to a job I hate because, to put it bluntly, I need the $$. I mean, it’s part-time, so I could continue to do some freelance work, right? But, after three months, I’m actually happy. Do I put up with the emotional turmoil and drama that comes along with the job for the paycheck? Then, of course, there’s the question: does part-time really mean part-time or will it turn into full-time with part-time pay? If that happened, I’d have to put my foot down and possibly quit, which would mean I’m not eligible for unemployment benefits. It’s like the boyfriend you know you shouldn’t go back to, but the sex is so good.

I’m torn. Any advice would be much appreciated.

WSJ Reports That Job Seekers Want to Find Resources and Contacts, Not Troll Job Fairs

wall-street-journal

Check out Joseph De Avila’s great article in today’s Wall Street Journal Career section titled “Ditching the Job Fair for  a Venting Opportunity”. It features our friends at Laidoff Moveon and LaidOffCamp.

The piece discusses events around the country that aren’t focused on recruiting but on meeting other laid-off people, trading job leads and exchanging resources. People helping people. Glad to know the word is still spreading, good karma is flowing and people are benefitting from others’ ingenuity!

http://bit.ly/EPQVn

Let’s Unleash the Experts: 7 Tried-and-True Networking Tips from President and CEO of Executives Network

Molly Wendell – President and CEO of Executives Network – was one of us, so she definitely knows how it feels to be scrambling for work and what it takes to get back into the game.

Some scoop from her peeps: “Molly was once out of work for two years and three days—until she finally figured out networking was the key to landing a job. She gave the popular job boards a pink slip—and then put her own job search ideas to work. The result? Molly had nearly 30 job offers in 90 days! Since then, Molly has since helped more than 2,500 people land jobs.” This gal obviously knows something.

Molly Wendell’s 7 Tips for Landing a Job in 2009
1.  FIRE the job boards. Stop wasting time sitting behind the computer—it’s highly inefficient
2.  Get out and meet people—network, network, network
3.  Be proactive (not reactive)
4.  Be specific and terrific
5.  Make a great first (and lasting) impression
6.  Tap into “the strength of the weak.” Those you know the least tend to provide the strongest contacts
7.  Stay positive and motivated

Read more here: http://tinyurl.com/qv52v5

PS: I employed almost all of these networking tips during the course of my job search…and they work! However, I wish I’d thought about #6. That’s a good one to keep in mind. Thanks so much for telling us your secrets, Molly!